/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

My interesting weekend reading was this Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) report, which was vendor sponsored, highlighting 11 cloud security threats that should be on top of everyone’s mind. These threats are described as “egregious.”

CSA surveyed 241 experts on security issues in the cloud industry and came up with these top 11 threats:

  1. Data breaches
  2. Misconfiguration and inadequate change control
  3. Lack of cloud security architecture and strategy
  4. Insufficient identity, credential, access, and key management
  5. Account hijacking
  6. Insider threat
  7. Insecure interfaces and APIs
  8. Weak control plane
  9. Metastructure and applistructure failures
  10. Limited cloud usage visibility
  11. Abuse and nefarious use of cloud services

This is a pretty good report, by the way. It’s free to download, and if you’re interested in the evolution of cloud computing security, it’s a good read.  

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

My interesting weekend reading was this Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) report, which was vendor sponsored, highlighting 11 cloud security threats that should be on top of everyone’s mind. These threats are described as “egregious.”

CSA surveyed 241 experts on security issues in the cloud industry and came up with these top 11 threats:

  1. Data breaches
  2. Misconfiguration and inadequate change control
  3. Lack of cloud security architecture and strategy
  4. Insufficient identity, credential, access, and key management
  5. Account hijacking
  6. Insider threat
  7. Insecure interfaces and APIs
  8. Weak control plane
  9. Metastructure and applistructure failures
  10. Limited cloud usage visibility
  11. Abuse and nefarious use of cloud services

This is a pretty good report, by the way. It’s free to download, and if you’re interested in the evolution of cloud computing security, it’s a good read.  

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

My interesting weekend reading was this Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) report, which was vendor sponsored, highlighting 11 cloud security threats that should be on top of everyone’s mind. These threats are described as “egregious.”

CSA surveyed 241 experts on security issues in the cloud industry and came up with these top 11 threats:

  1. Data breaches
  2. Misconfiguration and inadequate change control
  3. Lack of cloud security architecture and strategy
  4. Insufficient identity, credential, access, and key management
  5. Account hijacking
  6. Insider threat
  7. Insecure interfaces and APIs
  8. Weak control plane
  9. Metastructure and applistructure failures
  10. Limited cloud usage visibility
  11. Abuse and nefarious use of cloud services

This is a pretty good report, by the way. It’s free to download, and if you’re interested in the evolution of cloud computing security, it’s a good read.  

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By Paul Krill / 0 Comments

Microsoft has unveiled a preview of a C++-based vectorized query engine for the Azure Databricks cloud analytics and AI service based on Apache Spark. Azure Databricks, which is delivered in partnership with Databricks, introduced the Photon-powered Delta Engine September 22.

Written in C++ and compatible with Spark APIs, Photon is a vectorized query engine that leverages modern CPU architecture and the Delta Lake open source transactional storage layer to enhance Apache Spark 3.0 performance by as much as 20x. Microsoft said that as organizations embrace data-driven decision-making, it is now imperative for them to have a platform that can quickly analyze massive amounts and types of data.

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By Paul Krill / 0 Comments

Microsoft has unveiled a preview of a C++-based vectorized query engine for the Azure Databricks cloud analytics and AI service based on Apache Spark. Azure Databricks, which is delivered in partnership with Databricks, introduced the Photon-powered Delta Engine September 22.

Written in C++ and compatible with Spark APIs, Photon is a vectorized query engine that leverages modern CPU architecture and the Delta Lake open source transactional storage layer to enhance Apache Spark 3.0 performance by as much as 20x. Microsoft said that as organizations embrace data-driven decision-making, it is now imperative for them to have a platform that can quickly analyze massive amounts and types of data.

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By Paul Krill / 0 Comments

Microsoft has unveiled a preview of a C++-based vectorized query engine for the Azure Databricks cloud analytics and AI service based on Apache Spark. Azure Databricks, which is delivered in partnership with Databricks, introduced the Photon-powered Delta Engine September 22.

Written in C++ and compatible with Spark APIs, Photon is a vectorized query engine that leverages modern CPU architecture and the Delta Lake open source transactional storage layer to enhance Apache Spark 3.0 performance by as much as 20x. Microsoft said that as organizations embrace data-driven decision-making, it is now imperative for them to have a platform that can quickly analyze massive amounts and types of data.

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

Our ability to augment technology with artificial intelligence and machine learning does not seem to have limits. We now have AI-powered analytics, smart Internet of Things, AI at the edge, and of course AIops tools.

At their essence, AIops tools do smart automations. These include self-healing, proactive maintenance, even working with security and governance systems to coordinate actions, such as identifying a performance issue as a breach.

We need to consider discovery as well, or the capability of gathering data ongoing and leveraging that data to train the knowledge engine. This allows the knowledgebases to become savvier. Greater knowledge about how the systems under management behave or are likely to behave creates a better capability of predicting issues and being proactive around fixes and reporting. 

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

Our ability to augment technology with artificial intelligence and machine learning does not seem to have limits. We now have AI-powered analytics, smart Internet of Things, AI at the edge, and of course AIops tools.

At their essence, AIops tools do smart automations. These include self-healing, proactive maintenance, even working with security and governance systems to coordinate actions, such as identifying a performance issue as a breach.

We need to consider discovery as well, or the capability of gathering data ongoing and leveraging that data to train the knowledge engine. This allows the knowledgebases to become savvier. Greater knowledge about how the systems under management behave or are likely to behave creates a better capability of predicting issues and being proactive around fixes and reporting. 

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By Shane Johnson / 0 Comments

As information and processing needs have grown, pain points such as performance and resiliency have necessitated new solutions. Databases need to maintain ACID compliance and consistency, provide high availability and high performance, and handle massive workloads without becoming a drain on resources. Sharding has offered a solution, but for many companies sharding has reached its limits, due to its complexity and resource requirements. A better solution is distributed SQL.

In a distributed SQL implementation, the database is distributed across multiple physical systems, delivering transactions at a globally scalable level. MariaDB Platform X5, a major release that includes upgrades to every aspect of MariaDB Platform, provides distributed SQL and massive scalability through the addition of a new smart storage engine called Xpand. With a shared nothing architecture, fully distributed ACID transactions, and strong consistency, Xpand allows you to scale to millions of transactions per second.

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/ By Matt Asay / 0 Comments

The Snowflake IPO was a big deal, and not merely because of the company’s enormous valuation.

In 2013 Cloudera co-founder Mike Olson confidently (and accurately) declared “a stunning and irreversible trend in enterprise infrastructure.” That trend? “No dominant platform-level software infrastructure has emerged in the last 10 years in closed-source, proprietary form.” Snowflake, a cloud-based enterprise data platform, may spell the end of that run. 

Sure, we had Splunk, but Spunk squeaked through the hypothesis police before open source had found its feet, as Lightspeed partner Gaurav Gupta told me. MySQL, Apache Hadoop, MongoDB, Apache Spark... all of them (at least initially) open source.

To read this article in full, please click here