/ By Isaac Sacolick / 0 Comments

Public clouds and big tech target low-code capabilities

I’ve been using low-code and no-code platforms for almost two decades to build internal workflow applications and rapidly develop customer-facing experiences. I always had development teams working on Java, .NET, or PHP applications built on top of SQL and NoSQL datastores, but the business demand for applications far exceeded what we could develop. Low-code and no-code platforms provided an alternative option when the business requirements matched the platform’s capabilities.

I recently shared seven low-code platforms developers should know and what IT leaders can learn from low-code platform CTOs. Many of these platforms have been around longer than a decade, and some support tens of thousands of business applications. Over time these platforms have improved capabilities, developer experiences, hosting options, enterprise security, devops tools, application integrations, and other competencies that enable rapid development and easy maintainenance of functionally rich applications.

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