/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

According to a study by the Cloud Security Alliance, 69 percent of enterprises have moved or are moving mission-critical information to the cloud. The research also shows 65 percent of businesses are worried about migrating sensitive data, and 59 percent of them have security concerns.

I get it. If your data is in the cloud, then it’s not in your data center. You can’t touch the server, therefore it must be unsecure or at risk.

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/ By Bob Muglia / 0 Comments

I had a front row seat at Microsoft to watch the first two application model transitions. Early mainframe and minicomputer systems were monolithic, with data storage, application code, and terminal services all in one box. When the microprocessor and Ethernet networks emerged during the 1980’s, they enabled lower-cost computers to work together and communicate over local area networks. PC’s and Unix workstations began to connect to servers, leveraging a new, multi-machine, client-server programming model for business applications. Client-server applications emerged with a graphical user interface coupled to a back-end SQL database (frequently Oracle Database or SQL Server).

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/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

We’re in a recovery now, and at some point, things will be back to near normal…hopefully. We learned that some businesses fared better than others during the upheaval. Nine times out of ten, those businesses leveraged cloud successfully to navigate the quick IT changes needed during the pandemic.

Many enterprises have learned some hard lessons. Indeed, I suspect more will come. Enterprises discovered more about the advantages and limitations of cloud computing in the last four months than in the previous two years. Here are three of the big ones I see consistently:

Cloudops is more important than we thought. Cloud operations has been an afterthought for many enterprises, even post-deployment. Most IT organizations gave it some attention, but cloudops best practices and use of technology have been limited by small budgets and a general lack of understanding. During the pandemic the chickens came home to roost.

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/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

I’m a big fan of IEEE’s coverage of the emerging cloud computing space. The technical depth of the articles won’t tempt the average IT reader to subscribe, but I like their focus on new innovations, followed by the detailed solutions that prove the innovations—sometimes too much detail. 

I recently came across this article titled “Energy-Efficient Decision Making for Mobile Cloud Offloading.” It triggered a mental note that mobile computing devices have lived with clouds for more than 10 years. We have yet to put a stake in the ground or a best practice around the tiering of mobile device processing and data storage. Perhaps it’s time.

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/ By Paul Krill / 0 Comments

With Amazon Honeycode, introduced June 24, 2020, Amazon Web Services is offering a managed AWS service that allows non-technical users to build mobile and web apps without writing any code. 

Now in beta, Honeycode uses a spreadsheet model, allowing users to leverage what they know about spreadsheets and formulas. The goal is to enable quick development of custom apps without having to wait for the IT department or developers to find the time to do so. Instead, non-programmers such as business analysts, finance managers, and technical program managers can build these apps via a visual interface.

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/ By Paul Krill / 0 Comments

With Amazon Honeycode, introduced June 24, 2020, Amazon Web Services is offering a managed AWS service that allows non-technical users to build mobile and web apps without writing any code. 

Now in beta, Honeycode uses a spreadsheet model, allowing users to leverage what they know about spreadsheets and formulas. The goal is to enable quick development of custom apps without having to wait for the IT department or developers to find the time to do so. Instead, non-programmers such as business analysts, finance managers, and technical program managers can build these apps via a visual interface.

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/ By Scott Carey / 0 Comments

Based in San Mateo, California, Rakuten Rewards is a shopping rewards company that makes money through affiliate marketing links across the web. In return, members earn reward points every time they make a purchase through a partner retailer and get cash back rewards.

Naturally this drives a lot of user insight data – hundreds of terabytes on active recall with more in cold storage, to be exact.

Also on InfoWorld: Snowflake review: A data warehouse made better in the cloud ]

In 2018 the business started to get serious about giving more users access to this insight – without having Python or Scala coding chops – while also reducing its capital expenditure on hardware, and started looking to the cloud.

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/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

Artificial intelligence for IT operation platforms, better known as AIops, is an evolving and expanded use of technologies that for the past several years were categorized as IT operations analytics. The growth of AIops has been clear to anyone watching the market, but if you need some statistics, Gartner reports that by 2022, 40 percent of large enterprises will use AIops tools to support or replace monitoring and service desk tasks, up from 5 percent today.

That’s a pretty big jump. However, it’s also an indication that many enterprises may pick AIops tools for the wrong purposes—mistakes that will likely cost millions. Here is what I’m seeing.

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/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

When computing first began computers that were way too expensive for most companies were shared via timeshare services. Processing was centralized, using multiuser systems.   

Then minicomputers, PC, and LANs came along, and we moved processing out to PC workstations and smaller compute platforms. We saw the decentralization of computing. Now, years later, we’re centralizing processing again on public cloud hyperscalers, but this time using a multitenant approach. Getting dizzy?

These days we’re also considering decentralization again, with the rise of edge computing. We’ve talked about edge here before, and my conclusion remains that there are reasons to leverage edge computing, certainly to reduce latency and to store data locally.

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/ By Scott Carey / 0 Comments

The Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) Group – which will soon be rebranded as Natwest Group under new CEO Alison Rose – has been on a big technology modernization drive since its government bailout after the 2007 banking crisis.

A key part of that mission involves speeding up software delivery cycles for its internal and customer-facing applications, while cutting out inefficient processes and costs by automating away manual server provisioning tasks, a practice which has really picked up pace across the bank in the past three years.

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