/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

It’s not really news anymore. Gartner recently stated that the current lack of skilled IT workers is foiling the adoption of cloud, edge computing, and other technologies. Note, these are all cloud related in one way or another.

In its “2021-2023 Emerging Technology Roadmap” based on surveys of 437 global firms, Gartner discovered that IT executives see the talent shortage as the largest barrier to deploying emerging technologies, mostly cloud-based technologies such as databases, machine learning, advanced storage, and analytics, all of which are easily weaponized for strategic purposes for the business.

For instance, a manufacturing business is seeking to digitally enable its supply chain systems to improve business outcomes. It learned from the pandemic-caused shortages that there was no easy way to work around missing components that stopped a product from being manufactured and sold. You only need to look at the acres of cars and trucks waiting for missing chips today to understand how this can kill a business.

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

It’s not really news anymore. Gartner recently stated that the current lack of skilled IT workers is foiling the adoption of cloud, edge computing, and other technologies. Note, these are all cloud related in one way or another.

In its “2021-2023 Emerging Technology Roadmap” based on surveys of 437 global firms, Gartner discovered that IT executives see the talent shortage as the largest barrier to deploying emerging technologies, mostly cloud-based technologies such as databases, machine learning, advanced storage, and analytics, all of which are easily weaponized for strategic purposes for the business.

For instance, a manufacturing business is seeking to digitally enable its supply chain systems to improve business outcomes. It learned from the pandemic-caused shortages that there was no easy way to work around missing components that stopped a product from being manufactured and sold. You only need to look at the acres of cars and trucks waiting for missing chips today to understand how this can kill a business.

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By Simon Bisson / 0 Comments

Microsoft continues to do interesting open source work through its Deis Labs team. Here you’ll find important Kubernetes tools like Helm and CNAB, as well as a set of intriguing WebAssembly projects. Having a group like Deis is important for Microsoft. It allows Azure to experiment with new cloud-native technologies without committing to launch, while providing it with a useful point of contact with standards bodies and open source foundations.

Deis’ work with WebAssembly is particularly interesting. It’s clear that Microsoft is concerned about the limitations of containers as the lowest level of cloud-native application development. Significant overhead makes containers impractical for many edge applications, especially where small devices come into play. They’re an issue in larger-scale distributed applications where you want the isolation of containers but don’t need to run a complete operating system, using serverless models outside of traditional serverless infrastructures.

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/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

You’re a new CIO. It’s 9:00 a.m. on a Wednesday and you’re in an emergency Zoom meeting with IT operations leaders. The faces on the screen are somber, and it’s clear why when they explain the purpose of the meeting.

It seems that all of IT ops, which was initially budgeted at $10 million for this fiscal year, is now looking at a $4 million overrun due to the unanticipated cost of the operations personnel and tools needed to operate the new bunch of applications and databases that just moved to a public cloud.

What happened? It’s likely they hit a “cloudops wall,” meaning that the cost of operating systems in the cloud was underestimated by 20% to 30%. They assumed that, at most, the cost of operating the same systems in the cloud would be about 10% more than on premises. Indeed, the industry told them that operations cost would likely be reduced.

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(Insider Story)