/ By Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols / 0 Comments
To manage moving all your server applications to the cloud in containers, you’ll need to do some container orchestration, that's where Kubernetes comes in.
/ By Paul Krill / 0 Comments

Pulumi has added .NET language support to its open source tool for Kubernetes and cloud provisioning and management. The Pulumi infrastructure-as-code tool now allows developers to declaratively provision cloud infrastructure using Microsoft .NET languages. 

With Pulumi, developers can use .NET languages including C#, VB.NET, and F# to declaratively provision infrastructure on AWS, Azure, Google Cloud Platform, and Kubernetes. The tool already supported JavaScript, TypeScript, Python, and Go.

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By communityteam@solarwinds.com / 0 Comments

Omar Rafik, SolarWinds Senior Manager, Federal Sales Engineering

 

Here’s an interesting article by my colleague Brandon Shopp with ideas for protecting IT assets in battlefield situations.

 

“Dominance” and “protection” sum up the Defense Department’s goals as U.S. armed forces begin to modernize their networks and communications systems. DOD is investing significant resources in providing troops with highly advanced technology so they can effectively communicate with each other and allies in even the harshest environments.

 

Efforts like the Army’s ESB-E tactical network initiative, for example, represent an attempt to keep warfighters constantly connected through a unified communications network. These solutions will be built off more scalable, adaptable, and powerful platforms than those provided by older legacy systems.

 

Programs like ESB-E are being designed to provide wide-scale communications in hostile territory. It will be incumbent upon troops in the field to monitor, manage, and secure the network to fulfill the “protection” part of DOD’s two-fisted battlefield domination strategy.

 

Moving forward to take this technological hill, DOD should keep these three considerations in mind.

 

  1. 1. The Attack Surface Will Increase Exponentially

 

Over the years, the battlefield has become increasingly kinetic and dependent upon interconnected devices and even artificial intelligence. The Army Research Laboratory calls this the internet of battlefield things—a warzone with different points of contact ultimately resulting in everything and everyone being more connected and, thus, intelligent.

 

The Pentagon is looking to take the concept as far as possible to give warfighters a tactical and strategic edge. For example, the Army wants to network soldiers and their weapons systems, and the Navy plans to link its platforms across hundreds of ships.

 

Opening these communication channels will significantly increase the potential attack surface. The more connection points, the greater the threat of exposure. Securing a communications system of such complexity will prove to be a far more daunting challenge than what’s involved in monitoring and managing a traditional IT network. Armed forces must be prepared to monitor, maintain, and secure the entire communications system.

 

  1. 2. Everyone Must Have Systems Expertise

 

The line between soldiers and system administrators has blurred as technology has advanced into the battlefield. As communications systems expand, all service members must be able to identify problems to ensure both unimpeded and uninterrupted communications and the security of the information being exchanged.

 

All troops must be bought into the concept of protecting the network and its communications components and be highly skilled in managing and maintaining these technologies. This is particularly important as communications solutions evolve.

 

Soldiers will need to quickly secure communications tools if they’re compromised, just as they would any other piece of equipment harboring sensitive information or access points. And they will require clear visibility into the entirety of the network to be able to quickly pinpoint any anomalies.

 

  1. 3. Staff Must Increase Commensurate to the Size of the Task

 

The armed forces must bulk up on staff to support these expansive modern communications systems. Fortunately, the military has a wealth of individuals with network and systems administration experience. Unfortunately, they lack in other critical areas.

 

Security specialists remain in high demand, but the cybersecurity workforce gap is real, even in the military. The White House’s National Cyber Strategy offers some good recommendations, including reskilling workers from other disciplines and identifying and fostering new talent. The actions highlighted in the plan coalesce with DOD’s need to fortify and strengthen its cybersecurity workforce as it turns its focus toward relentlessly winning the battlefield communications war.

 

Whoever wins this war will truly establish dominance over air, land, sea, and cyberspace. Victory lies in educating and finding the right personnel to protect information across what will undoubtedly be a wider and more attractive target for America’s adversaries.

 

Find the full article on Government Computer News.

 

  The SolarWinds trademarks, service marks, and logos are the exclusive property of SolarWinds Worldwide, LLC or its affiliates. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

/ By communityteam@solarwinds.com / 0 Comments

Omar Rafik, SolarWinds Senior Manager, Federal Sales Engineering

 

Here’s an interesting article by my colleague Brandon Shopp with ideas for protecting IT assets in battlefield situations.

 

“Dominance” and “protection” sum up the Defense Department’s goals as U.S. armed forces begin to modernize their networks and communications systems. DOD is investing significant resources in providing troops with highly advanced technology so they can effectively communicate with each other and allies in even the harshest environments.

 

Efforts like the Army’s ESB-E tactical network initiative, for example, represent an attempt to keep warfighters constantly connected through a unified communications network. These solutions will be built off more scalable, adaptable, and powerful platforms than those provided by older legacy systems.

 

Programs like ESB-E are being designed to provide wide-scale communications in hostile territory. It will be incumbent upon troops in the field to monitor, manage, and secure the network to fulfill the “protection” part of DOD’s two-fisted battlefield domination strategy.

 

Moving forward to take this technological hill, DOD should keep these three considerations in mind.

 

  1. 1. The Attack Surface Will Increase Exponentially

 

Over the years, the battlefield has become increasingly kinetic and dependent upon interconnected devices and even artificial intelligence. The Army Research Laboratory calls this the internet of battlefield things—a warzone with different points of contact ultimately resulting in everything and everyone being more connected and, thus, intelligent.

 

The Pentagon is looking to take the concept as far as possible to give warfighters a tactical and strategic edge. For example, the Army wants to network soldiers and their weapons systems, and the Navy plans to link its platforms across hundreds of ships.

 

Opening these communication channels will significantly increase the potential attack surface. The more connection points, the greater the threat of exposure. Securing a communications system of such complexity will prove to be a far more daunting challenge than what’s involved in monitoring and managing a traditional IT network. Armed forces must be prepared to monitor, maintain, and secure the entire communications system.

 

  1. 2. Everyone Must Have Systems Expertise

 

The line between soldiers and system administrators has blurred as technology has advanced into the battlefield. As communications systems expand, all service members must be able to identify problems to ensure both unimpeded and uninterrupted communications and the security of the information being exchanged.

 

All troops must be bought into the concept of protecting the network and its communications components and be highly skilled in managing and maintaining these technologies. This is particularly important as communications solutions evolve.

 

Soldiers will need to quickly secure communications tools if they’re compromised, just as they would any other piece of equipment harboring sensitive information or access points. And they will require clear visibility into the entirety of the network to be able to quickly pinpoint any anomalies.

 

  1. 3. Staff Must Increase Commensurate to the Size of the Task

 

The armed forces must bulk up on staff to support these expansive modern communications systems. Fortunately, the military has a wealth of individuals with network and systems administration experience. Unfortunately, they lack in other critical areas.

 

Security specialists remain in high demand, but the cybersecurity workforce gap is real, even in the military. The White House’s National Cyber Strategy offers some good recommendations, including reskilling workers from other disciplines and identifying and fostering new talent. The actions highlighted in the plan coalesce with DOD’s need to fortify and strengthen its cybersecurity workforce as it turns its focus toward relentlessly winning the battlefield communications war.

 

Whoever wins this war will truly establish dominance over air, land, sea, and cyberspace. Victory lies in educating and finding the right personnel to protect information across what will undoubtedly be a wider and more attractive target for America’s adversaries.

 

Find the full article on Government Computer News.

 

  The SolarWinds trademarks, service marks, and logos are the exclusive property of SolarWinds Worldwide, LLC or its affiliates. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

Data integration solutions come in one of three categories. First there’s old school data integration solutions created in the 1990s from the EAI movement, now expanded to include public cloud computing domains. Second, newer cloud-based iPaaS (integration platforms as a service) solutions built from the ground up as on-demand integration servers hosted on the open Internet, but existing outside of public cloud providers. Third, data integration solution existing within public clouds, which are typically more primitive. However, these native services are easily deployable from inside a public cloud provider.

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

Data integration solutions come in one of three categories. First there’s old school data integration solutions created in the 1990s from the EAI movement, now expanded to include public cloud computing domains. Second, newer cloud-based iPaaS (integration platforms as a service) solutions built from the ground up as on-demand integration servers hosted on the open Internet, but existing outside of public cloud providers. Third, data integration solution existing within public clouds, which are typically more primitive. However, these native services are easily deployable from inside a public cloud provider.

To read this article in full, please click here

/ By communityteam@solarwinds.com / 0 Comments

We talk a lot about professional development these days—how to develop your speaking or writing skills to make you a better practitioner. But what if you’ve reached a certain point in your career and you feel it’s time for a change?

 

Do you stay a technologist, or do you make the leap to management? It’s a conversation I’ve had with many people over the years and a question I’ve wrestled with myself. Several years ago, I made the jump. At the time, it was the wrong choice. In the following years, I spoke with many leaders and gathered many thoughts on what makes for a successful and satisfied IT leader. Below are the top five considerations I wish someone had shared with me prior to taking the management path.

 

How in Love With Technology Are You?

We could debate the best course, but often the person promoted to management is the one who knows the most about their technology. Ironically, once in management, you aren’t as hands-on as you once were. If all you want to do is geek out on tech, I’d urge you to be cautious about moving into management. Talk with your boss and other leaders to understand how much tech will (or won’t) be a part of the new management position.

 

How “Confident” Are You?

This question is something of a misnomer. What I really mean is how are your soft skills and do you enjoy leveraging them? Once you drop into management, you’ll still need to be able to talk the talk and periodically walk the walk of a technologist, but your ability to communicate will become much more important. The same can be said of writing, presentation, and financial skills. Taking some time to evaluate what you truly enjoy doing and where your skills lie will make for a much more informed decision on whether you should take management plunge.

 

Do Your Thoughts/Ideals/Morals Align With Your Organization?

While it’s possible to make changes affecting your workplace once you reach management, I’d caution you against thinking you can solve everything wrong with the world and steer your company in a completely different direction. Take the time to look at how your organization treats people. Are other managers satisfied in their roles? Do you generally agree with the direction and leadership of your organization? Depending on the type of person you are, this isn’t a make-or-break question. Regardless of your role, it’s often easier and more effective to row in the same direction as your organization.

 

How Thick Is Your Skin?

This one is simple: when you lead a team, you’re ultimately responsible for the team’s actions and productivity within the organization. On the surface, this seems like a noble charge, and it is. However, there will be days where people just want to yell at whomever is in charge—you. I work within a fantastic, compassionate organization, and there are still days where “The Buck Stops Here” means I’m going to get earfuls from various corners of the org. It goes with the territory. Are you OK finding yourself in this position? It’s a question you’ll want to consider.

 

From What Do You Derive Value?

I’m not talking about financial reward of moving into management, although hopefully there’s something of a reward. What I’m talking about is how you motivate yourself, where the sense of accomplishment comes from. Basically, what makes you tick?

For me, this was the biggest adjustment in going from an individual contributor role to management. The reward systems can be very different. As an individual contributor, the feedback is often immediate in that, when you achieve or accomplish a task, there’s immediate satisfaction from completion. Many technologists love this aspect of IT—you’re constantly getting things done, you’re a doer. Depending on the size of your org, when you move into management, you’ll be removed from at least some of the day-to-day “doing.” So, where do the rewards come from?

 

I’ve had this discussion with leaders of varying sizes of organizations and a couple of themes come to the fore across these chats. Successful and satisfied managers talk about the joy from helping develop people. Being an empathetic person and seeing others succeed can become a powerful replacement for that sense of accomplishment. Having a strategic mindset and seeing your place in a larger puzzle can help ease the loss of the day-to-day tactical achievements.

 

Is Management Right for Me?

Well, nobody can decide if it’s right for you or not. I’ll share one final thought with you, though. At the start of this piece, I said I was wrong about going into management. That was true. In that role, I wasn’t a great manager, and I voluntarily went back to an engineering role. I’ve since made the jump again, in a situation better suited to me and for an organization who helps to develop my skills and wants to see me succeed as a manager. I have a better idea of what to expect and I’m much happier this time around. Whether you decide to make the leap into management or not, know it’s not a one-way street. Whichever way you decide to go, I hope the thoughts here help you on your journey.

 

I like sharing my thoughts on the softer side of IT. If you’ve found this article interesting, please check out my other articles The Most Important Skill You're Not Hiring For and Know Your IT Department Frenemies (aka Why Can’t We Be Friends?).

/ By communityteam@solarwinds.com / 0 Comments

We talk a lot about professional development these days—how to develop your speaking or writing skills to make you a better practitioner. But what if you’ve reached a certain point in your career and you feel it’s time for a change?

 

Do you stay a technologist, or do you make the leap to management? It’s a conversation I’ve had with many people over the years and a question I’ve wrestled with myself. Several years ago, I made the jump. At the time, it was the wrong choice. In the following years, I spoke with many leaders and gathered many thoughts on what makes for a successful and satisfied IT leader. Below are the top five considerations I wish someone had shared with me prior to taking the management path.

 

How in Love With Technology Are You?

We could debate the best course, but often the person promoted to management is the one who knows the most about their technology. Ironically, once in management, you aren’t as hands-on as you once were. If all you want to do is geek out on tech, I’d urge you to be cautious about moving into management. Talk with your boss and other leaders to understand how much tech will (or won’t) be a part of the new management position.

 

How “Confident” Are You?

This question is something of a misnomer. What I really mean is how are your soft skills and do you enjoy leveraging them? Once you drop into management, you’ll still need to be able to talk the talk and periodically walk the walk of a technologist, but your ability to communicate will become much more important. The same can be said of writing, presentation, and financial skills. Taking some time to evaluate what you truly enjoy doing and where your skills lie will make for a much more informed decision on whether you should take management plunge.

 

Do Your Thoughts/Ideals/Morals Align With Your Organization?

While it’s possible to make changes affecting your workplace once you reach management, I’d caution you against thinking you can solve everything wrong with the world and steer your company in a completely different direction. Take the time to look at how your organization treats people. Are other managers satisfied in their roles? Do you generally agree with the direction and leadership of your organization? Depending on the type of person you are, this isn’t a make-or-break question. Regardless of your role, it’s often easier and more effective to row in the same direction as your organization.

 

How Thick Is Your Skin?

This one is simple: when you lead a team, you’re ultimately responsible for the team’s actions and productivity within the organization. On the surface, this seems like a noble charge, and it is. However, there will be days where people just want to yell at whomever is in charge—you. I work within a fantastic, compassionate organization, and there are still days where “The Buck Stops Here” means I’m going to get earfuls from various corners of the org. It goes with the territory. Are you OK finding yourself in this position? It’s a question you’ll want to consider.

 

From What Do You Derive Value?

I’m not talking about financial reward of moving into management, although hopefully there’s something of a reward. What I’m talking about is how you motivate yourself, where the sense of accomplishment comes from. Basically, what makes you tick?

For me, this was the biggest adjustment in going from an individual contributor role to management. The reward systems can be very different. As an individual contributor, the feedback is often immediate in that, when you achieve or accomplish a task, there’s immediate satisfaction from completion. Many technologists love this aspect of IT—you’re constantly getting things done, you’re a doer. Depending on the size of your org, when you move into management, you’ll be removed from at least some of the day-to-day “doing.” So, where do the rewards come from?

 

I’ve had this discussion with leaders of varying sizes of organizations and a couple of themes come to the fore across these chats. Successful and satisfied managers talk about the joy from helping develop people. Being an empathetic person and seeing others succeed can become a powerful replacement for that sense of accomplishment. Having a strategic mindset and seeing your place in a larger puzzle can help ease the loss of the day-to-day tactical achievements.

 

Is Management Right for Me?

Well, nobody can decide if it’s right for you or not. I’ll share one final thought with you, though. At the start of this piece, I said I was wrong about going into management. That was true. In that role, I wasn’t a great manager, and I voluntarily went back to an engineering role. I’ve since made the jump again, in a situation better suited to me and for an organization who helps to develop my skills and wants to see me succeed as a manager. I have a better idea of what to expect and I’m much happier this time around. Whether you decide to make the leap into management or not, know it’s not a one-way street. Whichever way you decide to go, I hope the thoughts here help you on your journey.

 

I like sharing my thoughts on the softer side of IT. If you’ve found this article interesting, please check out my other articles The Most Important Skill You're Not Hiring For and Know Your IT Department Frenemies (aka Why Can’t We Be Friends?).

/ By communityteam@solarwinds.com / 0 Comments

Everyone take a deep breath and calm down. The likeliness of a robot taking over your job any time soon is very low. Yes, artificial intelligence (AI) is a growing trend, and machine learning has improved by leaps and bounds. However, the information technology career field is fairly safe, and if anything, AI/machine learning will only make things better for us in the future. However, a few IT jobs already have experienced the impact of AI, and I want to cover those here. Now, take this with a grain of salt, since AI/machine learning technology is fairly young and a lot of the news out there is simply conjecture.

 

Help Desk/IT Support

Think about the last time you called a support desk. Did your call get answered by a human or a robot? OK, maybe not an actual robot (that would be awesome), but an interactive voice response (IVR) system. How annoying is that? How often do we just start yelling, “Representative... representative... REPRESENTATIVE!” It can take several routes from an IVR system before we get a human who can help us out. This is all too often the situation when we call support or the help desk. Unfortunately (for help desk specialists), AI is only making IVR more efficient. AI enhances the capability of the IVR system to better understand and process human interaction over the phone. With IVR systems configured for automatic speech recognition (ASR), AI essentially eliminates the need for input via the keypad as it can more intelligently process the human voice response.

 

Data Center Admins

This one hurts because I’ve done a lot of data center admin work and still do some today. The idea of machine learning or AI replacing this job hits close to home. The truth is automation tools are already replacing common tasks data center admins used to carry out daily. Monitoring tools have used AI to improve data analytics pulled from system scans. Back when I started in IT, the general ratio was around one hundred systems to one administrator. With advances in monitoring, virtualization and AI, it’s now closer to one thousand systems to every administrator. While this is great for organizations looking to cut down on OPEX, it’s not great news for administrators.

 

Adapt or Die

Yeah, maybe that’s a little exaggerated, but it’s not a bad way to think. If you don’t see the technological advances as a hint to adapt, your career likely will die. AI and machine learning are hot topics right now, and there’s no better time to start learning the ins and outs of it and how you can adapt to work with AI instead of becoming obsolete. Understanding how to bridge the gap between humanity and technology can serve you well in the future. One way you can adapt is by learning programming, thereby gaining a better understanding of automation, AI, and machine learning. Maintain your creativity by implementing new ideas and using AI and machine learning to your advantage.

 

In the end, I don’t believe AI or machine learning will eliminate the need for a human workforce in IT. The human brain is far more adept at storing, processing, and analyzing data than any robot or machine will ever be. The human brain can adapt, learn, and connect with other humans in ways machines can’t. There might be an influx of jobs being taken over by AI, but we’ll always need humans to program the software and design the machines.