/ By Scott Carey / 0 Comments

The Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) Group – which will soon be rebranded as Natwest Group under new CEO Alison Rose – has been on a big technology modernization drive since its government bailout after the 2007 banking crisis.

A key part of that mission involves speeding up software delivery cycles for its internal and customer-facing applications, while cutting out inefficient processes and costs by automating away manual server provisioning tasks, a practice which has really picked up pace across the bank in the past three years.

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/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

Serverless is a game changer. As we look to accelerate the post-pandemic movement to cloud, we would love to remove the step of sizing the cloud resources we think the workloads will need.

Serverless automatically provisions the cloud resources needed, such as storage and compute, and then deprovisions them once the workloads are through processing. Although some call this a lazy person’s cloud platform service, removing the need to guess about provisioning the correct number of resources will keep you out of trouble these days.

However, with all the upsides there always are a few downsides. I have three to review with you.

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/ By Andrew C. Oliver / 0 Comments

A few years ago I was at a presentation at the Open Source Business Conference listening to an idiot. He compared people who supported various open source models to babies and derided “catering to developer preferences.” I don’t remember who he was but everything he said is wrong. Here’s why.

As the migration to the public cloud completes, eventually the number of transactions and thus operations executed in the public cloud will stagnate. Once that happens each technology vendor’s share of those operations and ultimately revenue will be a function tied directly to (drum roll please) developer preferences.

We can see this modeled in the web. The number of hits a popular website gets was growing as a function of the number of people on the Internet growing regardless of its increase in popularity. Once nearly everyone is online that changes. As the growth of Internet usage starts looking more like population growth in developed and developing countries, you see traffic stagnate.

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/ By Peter Wayner / 0 Comments

Is there anything more seductive than cloud machine price lists? There aren’t many of us old enough to remember paying a penny for a piece of candy, but cloud users enjoy prices that are even smaller.

Google’s N1 standard machine’s price is $0.0475 per hour but you can get it for just $0.0100 per hour for your batch processing needs—if you’re willing to be preempted by more important jobs. The crazy spenders can step up to the high CPU version for $0.015 per hour – still less than two cents. Woo-hoo!

Azure charges a miniscule $0.00099 per gigabyte to store data for a month in its archival storage tier. Amazon, though, may offer the most eye-popping low prices – charging an infinitesimal $0.0000002083 for 128 megabytes of memory to support a Lambda Function. (Four digits of precision?)

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/ By David Linthicum / 0 Comments

According to the 2020 Thales Data Threat Report – European Edition, European companies have a false sense of security when it comes to protecting themselves. Only two-thirds (68 percent) see themselves as vulnerable, down from 86 percent in 2018. This confidence contradicts the findings of the survey, where 509 executives revealed that slightly more than half (52 percent) of their European companies were hacked or failed a compliance audit in 2019. 

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/ By Peter Wayner / 0 Comments
The coronavirus crisis has shaken up business as usual, with some IT strategies and tools rising to the occasion and others in line for a rethink or tough recovery post-pandemic.(Insider Story)